Alerts

Annual Report 2021-22


From the Chief Executive

More than two years into the global COVID-19 pandemic and our state’s tourism industry is seeing the ‘green shoots’ of recovery emerge. Our forward thinking and innovative operators have worked hard to adapt their offerings for the COVID-normal environment which has been in a constant state of change.

With border closures and lockdowns a thing of the past, consumer confidence is increasing, and we are plotting our way back to our 2019 record-high $8.1 billion visitor economy. We’re rebuilding after our industry suffered the most severe contraction of tourism on record. At its lowest point, the visitor economy was just $4.4 billion in the year to March 2021. Through sheer hard work and determination, our state’s visitor economy has grown to $6.2 billion as of June 2022, ahead of our original impact forecast of $6.1 billion.

These results are on the back of South Australians continuing to holiday at home which saw intrastate overnight expenditure surpass pre-COVID levels by June 2021. Our state’s borders re-opening in November 2021 has seen strong growth in the interstate market, which has reached a post-pandemic record high of $1.9 billion – on its way to its pre-COVID value of $2.7 billion.

With Australia’s borders opening in February 2022, there’s been slower growth in the international market, but it is returning. International expenditure has almost doubled from $150 million at year end March 2022 to $272 million at year end June 2022. While it’s still well below its pre-COVID $1.2 billion, we’ve seen more international flights resume on the back of strong travel demand – a solid indication we’re on the right path.

Regional tourism has been the powerhouse through the pandemic, with performance at record-high levels for much of 2021. Data for the year end December 2021 showed South Australia’s regions were not only meeting – but beating – their visitor expenditure targets set for 2025. In fact, six out of our 11 tourism regions exceeded their 2025 visitor expenditure targets at the end of 2021, an impressive four years ahead of schedule. As of June 2022, total visitor expenditure in regional South Australia is $3.4 billion, just $600 million shy of its 2025 target of $4.0 billion.

In the Adelaide CBD, while recovery has been slower, we’ve also made some impressive inroads. We’ve celebrated the highest accommodation occupancy of major cities across Australia and New Zealand, and topped 2019 levels in some instances. Average occupancy for Adelaide accommodation in May 2022 was 79 per cent – the best result since the pandemic began, and higher than the equivalent period pre-COVID (May 2019). When you consider at the time of last year’s Annual Report, Adelaide hotels were yet to see occupancy levels on par with the pre-COVID period, this is a big step forward on the road to recovery.

Our focus is squarely on reclaiming our once record $8.1 billion visitor economy, on our way to $12.8 billion by 2030. We’ve delivered a range of key initiatives this past financial year to drive growth in our industry. These include the last four rounds of the Great State Voucher stimulus program, fully allocating the $20 million Tourism Industry Development Fund to 114 projects across the state and running four managed events in COVID-safe formats.

I’d like to acknowledge the work of our previous Chief Executive, Rodney Harrex who led the SATC for almost 10 years. His vision and passion for South Australia’s tourism industry took it to record heights and helped navigate our industry through the unprecedented challenges of a global pandemic for well over two years. Rod was Chief Executive for all of 2021-22, leaving the SATC in July 2022.

In 2022, we are getting a sense of normality back. Borders are open, consumers are booking holidays with increased confidence, people are coming back into the city, and we are learning to live with COVID. The work we have done over the past two and a half years puts us in a good position to build on the momentum of positive results.

Looking ahead, international events are back with the return of the Santos Tour Down Under in January 2023, and for the first time in two years, cruise ships are coming back to our shores with 106 cruise visits scheduled for the 2022-23 season.

Thank you to the South Australian tourism industry and the State Government for continuing to work with us to recover and grow our state’s visitor economy. We look forward to the year ahead as we enter the next phase of this journey.

Stephanie Rozokos
Chief Executive
South Australian Tourism Commission


Our strategic focus

 

Our Purpose Our role under the South Australian Tourism Commission Act 1993 is to assist in securing economic and social benefits for the people of South Australia through promoting the state as a tourism destination and further developing and improving the state’s tourism industry.
Our Vision To grow the visitor economy in South Australia to $12.8 billion by December 2030, generating 16,000 additional jobs.
Our Values Go Boldly - We thrive on taking risks and enjoy stepping outside our comfort zone.
Dig Deeper - We never settle for simply scratching the surface. We’re hungry for knowledge, fresh ideas and innovations.
Can Do - We believe there’s nothing we can’t do as a team.
Share The Love - We have a passion for excellence and exceeding expectations.
Our functions, objectives and deliverables To help us achieve our vision, our work is guided by six strategic priorities, outlined in the South Australian Visitor Economy Sector Plan 2030:
  • Marketing
  • Experience and supply development
  • Collaboration
  • Industry capability
  • Leisure and business events
  • Promote the value of tourism

Our organisational structure

Our organisational structure as of 30 June 2022.


Our Board structure as of 30 June 2022.

Name  Position Initial Appointment Appointment Expiry Date
Mr Andrew Bullock Chair and Director 2 July 2019 2 July 2021 – 1 July 2024
Mr John Irving Director 1 October 2011 8 October 2020 to 7 October 2022
Mr Grant Wilckens Director 2 July 2019 2 July 2021 – 1 July 2023
Mr Ian Horne Director 5 October 2006 2 July 2021 – 1 July 2023
Ms Donna Gauci Director 2 July 2019 2 July 2021 – 1 July 2023
Ms Jayne Flaherty Director 1 October 2019 1 October 2021 – 30 September 2023
Ms Helen Edwards Director 19 March 2020 19 March 2022 – 18 September 2022
Mr Rodney Harrex Ex-Officio 8 April 2013  


In 2021-22 there were eight Board Meetings held. All Board Directors attended all eight Board Meetings except for Mr Grant Wilckens and Ms Donna Gauci who attended seven Board Meetings.


Changes to the agency

During 2021-22 there were no changes to the agency’s structure and objectives as a result of internal reviews or machinery of government changes.


Our Minister

The Hon Zoe Bettison MP is the Minister for Tourism.


Our Executive team

Rodney Harrex is the Chief Executive, responsible for leading our agency to grow tourism in South Australia and increase the recognition of the value of tourism and its contribution to employment in our state.

Hitaf Rasheed is the Executive Director of Events South Australia, responsible for growing events in South Australia and attracting new events to the state to round out our events calendar. She also leads the management and delivery of the Santos Tour Down Under, Tasting Australia presented by RAA Travel, National Pharmacies Christmas Pageant and Bridgestone World Solar Challenge.

Erik de Roos is the Executive Director of Marketing, responsible for developing and delivering marketing activity that promotes all that South Australia has to offer. The current focus is on stimulating visitation in the COVID-normal environment and keeping South Australia top of mind as a compelling and accessible holiday destination.

Stephanie Rozokos is the Chief Financial Officer, responsible for driving the financial, business services and cultural direction of the agency, leading the finance, contracts, procurement, risk management, human resources and information communications technology functions.

Nick Jones is the Executive Director, Destination Development, responsible for increasing accessibility to South Australia, attracting new hotel and infrastructure development, and regional tourism development.


Legislation administered by the agency

South Australian Tourism Commission Act 1993
South Australian Motor Sport Act 1984
Major Events Act 2013


Performance at a glance

While the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have had a major impact on the South Australian visitor economy, as restrictions lift and people learn to live with COVID, there is evidence that travel is growing back to pre-pandemic levels. Even with this positive sentiment, there are concerns about inflation, the cost of living, energy costs, the escalation of geopolitical tensions and the ever-present risk of new variants impacting the recovery of the South Australian visitor economy.

The latest results for the June 2022 year end saw expenditure recover to $6.2 billion, ahead of the SATC’s original impact forecast of $6.1 billion (see table below). The recovery was on the back of stronger than expected conditions at various times in 2021, and a resurgent recovery from Omicron in 2022. In fact, the SATC’s model is now anticipating a recovery of the visitor economy to $7.6 billion by June 2023.

In 2021-22, the area of strength has been the intrastate overnight market, surpassing its pre COVID expenditure by June 2021, then reaching a record high $2.7 billion in intrastate spend by September 2021. As interstate and international borders have reopened, the intrastate overnight market has seen a small decline back to $2.5 billion in the latest results, 1 per cent down on pre-COVID levels. In this same period, the interstate market has grown to reach a new post-COVID high of $1.9 billion, a good result but still down 28 per cent on the $2.7 billion pre-COVID performance. With the borders reopening in February, the international market has started to grow, reaching $272 million, but still down 77 per cent on pre-COVID levels.

The recovery has been led by strong growth in interstate expenditure over the last quarter and the record high intrastate expenditure in response to the easing of COVID related travel restrictions.

There is cause for optimism as recovery has continued strongly into the current quarter (April, May and June). South Australia’s tourism industry has seen solid recoveries from both the interstate and international markets, as demonstrated by robust metrics from the accommodation sector (in both Adelaide and regions) as well as the aviation sector (both domestic and international).


Agency response to COVID-19

To support the state’s tourism industry during the pandemic, the SATC completed two significant initiatives during 2021-22.


Great State Vouchers
The SATC delivered the last four rounds of the Great State Voucher stimulus program from September 2021 until May 2022. Building on the success of the first four rounds, these vouchers proved popular with consumers, driving bookings with participating accommodation and tour/experience operators. Rounds five to eight injected $87.8 million into the state’s visitor economy. In total, the program achieved over 269,000 bookings, generating $148.7 million in expenditure and supporting 808 jobs, giving operators a much-needed boost. Originally launched in October 2020, the program provided consumers with a $100 voucher for participating CBD accommodation or $50 for regional and suburban accommodation. The program was then extended to include experience and tour vouchers which saw $100 vouchers available for single-day tours and experiences, and $200 vouchers for multi-day tours and experiences.

Tourism Industry Development Fund (TIDF)
The $20 million Tourism Industry Development Fund was fully allocated in February 2022. During 2021-22, 61 projects were funded. The TIDF was designed to support and stimulate private sector investment in new and improved regional accommodation, and the development of quality tourism product and experiences. It aimed to assist in the COVID recovery of regional tourism by encouraging regional operators to improve and diversify so they can attract more visitors and get a higher return on their offering. In total, there were 114 projects funded, worth a total of $82.7 million, creating 608 ongoing jobs and over 1,180 temporary construction jobs. Projects funded through the TIDF are projected to contribute $74.5 million to the economy each year. As of 30 June 2022, 59 of the 114 projects have been completed or nearly completed, providing visitors and locals alike with new accommodation and experiences to enjoy. The fund opened in September 2020 with funds allocated across the 2020-21 and 2021-22 financial years.


Agency contribution to whole of Government objectives

The following table includes a brief summary of the agency’s high-level contributions to the Government’s objectives.

Key objective Agency's contribution
More jobs The SATC’s goal is to generate 16,000 additional jobs in the visitor economy by December 2030. The latest employment results are to the year end June 2021 and show that employment in the South Australian tourism industry dropped by 7 per cent to 37,300 people in the year to June 2021. Overall, the decrease since the pre-COVID comparison point is of 8 per cent from 40,400. This is better than expected due to the positive impacts of the JobKeeper initiative which was active until 28 March 2021.
Lower costs The SATC provides services that benefit South Australian tourism operators through lowering costs associated with doing business. This includes:
  • Tourism Industry Development Fund – to support and stimulate private sector investment in new and improved regional accommodation, and the development of quality tourism product and experiences with a focus on the recovery of regional tourism post COVID-19.
  • Marketing of South Australia – funding to increase marketing with the aim of boosting international and domestic visitors to the state.
  • The SATC delivered four rounds of the Great State Voucher stimulus program in 2021-22, supporting accommodation, experiences, and tour operators both in the Adelaide CBD and regional South Australia.
  • The SATC covers the listing fees for South Australian tourism operators who list their products through the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse, a digital database and multi-channel distribution network for tourism data, industry products and destination information.
  • In 2021-22, the SATC subsidised a portion of the registration fee for tourism operators registered under the South Australia section for the Australian Tourism Exchange in Sydney in May 2022.
  • The SATC’s marketing campaigns provide promotion opportunities for a range of operators across the state. This includes making footage captured available for operators and tourism regions to use in their own marketing.
  • Industry events and products are promoted through the SATC website and social media platforms, which are at a zero cost to the operator.
  • Events South Australia provides sponsorship to leisure events throughout the year through its funding programs.
  • The SATC continues to seek opportunities to secure new major leisure events for South Australia to build the state’s event calendar.
  • Eleven Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) continued to receive funding from the SATC to support their role as the key contact between the SATC and regional stakeholders and industry. The SATC continued to provide each RTO with up to $20,000 for direct cooperative marketing activities under the Regional Cooperative Marketing Fund; this required RTOs to match the funding dollar for dollar. The SATC provided an additional $10,000 to RTOs, which was not required to be matched, to assist with the regions’ recovery from the impacts of COVID-19.
Better services
  • Since 2016, the SATC has provided funding to the Tourism Industry Council of South Australia (TiCSA), the state’s peak body for tourism, to assist its industry capability building programs and to provide service excellence training to tourism operators on a range of topics such as social media basics and online distribution and customer relationships.
  • The SATC provides support to industry through the provision of accurate, relevant, and concise research insights to assist industry in making informed business decisions, especially in relation to changed consumer behaviours post-COVID-19. It also works across key government agencies to provide timely advice and support to the sector.

Agency specific objectives and performance

The SATC’S key 2030 ambition is to grow the visitor economy to $12.8 billion, generating 16,000 additional jobs. To reach this bold vision, The South Australian Visitor Economy Sector Plan 2030 sets out six priority areas for industry development. They are: Marketing, Experience and Supply Development, Collaboration, Industry capability, Leisure events, and Promote the value of tourism.

As of June 2022, the state’s visitor economy is worth $6.2 billion, ahead of the SATC’s original impact forecast of $6.1 billion. In terms of tourism employment, the latest figures for 2020-21 show there were 37,300 people employed in the sector. While down, these results are better than expected due to the positive impacts of the JobKeeper initiative which was active until 28 March 2021. The SATC will not see the full effect of COVID-19 on employment until the 2021-22 State Tourism Satellite Accounts are released in June 2023.

The below table outlines the SATC’s high level targets and progress towards achieving its 2030 goals. For detailed information on the SATC’s strategic priorities under The South Australian Visitor Economy Sector Plan 2030 and its progress against these, please see the Board Performance Agreement Report at Appendix C.

Agency objectives Indicators Performance
2030 Target – Total expenditure Limit the decline in the value of our tourism sector to $6.1 billion per annum by June 2022 (on the way to our December 2030 target of $12.8 billion). Target achieved: the value of South Australia’s tourism sector fell 23 per cent to $6.2 billion in the year to June 2022.
2030 Target – International expenditure Limit the decline in international tourism expenditure in South Australia to $136 million by June 2022 with a milestone of $3.3 billion by December 2030. Target achieved: the value of South Australia’s international tourism fell 77 per cent to $272 million in the year to June 2022.
2030 target – Domestic expenditure Limit the decline in interstate overnight expenditure in South Australia to $1.5 billion by June 2022 and intrastate overnight expenditure to $2.6 billion. Target not achieved: the value of South Australia’s interstate tourism sector reached $1.9 billion and intrastate reached $2.5 billion in the year to June 2022.
2030 Target - Employment Limit the decline in tourism direct employment to 32,400 by June 2022 and 52,000 by 2030. June 2021 target was 26,200. Target achieved: the latest data shows direct employment in the tourism industry dropped by 7 per cent to 37,300 people in the year to June 2021. NB: The full effect on employment has been softened through the JobKeeper initiative.
2030 Target - Leisure events Increase the economic value of events to the full potential of $750 million by 2030 with a March 2022 waypoint of $288 million. Target not achieved: the value of South Australia’s leisure events sector fell 36 per cent to $246 million in the year to March 2022 (latest figures available at time of publication compared to December 2019). COVID-19 had a significant impact on events and festivals with numerous cancellations and postponements.

Corporate performance summary

The SATC continued to administer a range of processes and practices in delivering its responsibilities under the South Australian Tourism Act 1993 and in adherence to government financial, procurement, contracting, human resources, ICT, governance, risk management and auditing requirements.

The SATC maintains a high level of financial control over its destination development, events and marketing operations to ensure accountability for government resources. The SATC ended the 2021-22 financial year in line with budget and met all savings targets required. In 2021-22 an additional $9.8 million was provided to the SATC to deliver rounds 7 and 8 of the Great State Voucher program, building on the success of the earlier rounds.

The SATC developed its first “Reflect” Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), with final approval being granted by Reconciliation Australia in July 2021. In October 2021, the SATC launched the “Reflect” RAP. The Reflect RAP signifies the SATC’s commitment to reconciliation, with the launch celebrating the start of the agency’s reconciliation journey.

In 2021-22, the SATC continued to provide a safe working environment including a range of workplace measures to minimise the risk of COVID-19. The SATC provided staff with a range of initiatives aimed at promoting physical and mental wellbeing.

Staff took part in the SATC’s annual staff engagement survey in December 2021. This survey provided an objective mechanism for assessing the cultural environment. Results from the survey showed an improvement in staff engagement from 2020 and reported high levels of staff engagement, well above available industry benchmarks. Individual performance reviews were used to identify both organisational and individual learning and development needs and opportunities.

The SATC’s values are promoted within the organisation. The ‘Culture and Values’ working group aims to drive and influence the agency’s culture through staff engagement and implementation of initiatives which endorse the SATC values. In 2021-22, staff wellbeing has continued to be a major focus for the working group.


The SATC has increased organisational cyber security maturity in accordance with the South Australian Government cyber security requirements, namely South Australian Protective Security Framework and the South Australian Cyber Security Framework. This has been achieved through partnerships with external agencies to continuously assess and improve upon the requirements and guidelines contained within these frameworks.


Employment opportunity programs

Program name Performance
SATC Student Placement Program The SATC works with local higher education providers to offer placements to students currently enrolled in courses related to tourism, marketing and events. In 2021-22, six student placements were supported.
Aboriginal Employment Strategy In line with the deliverables of the SATC’s first Reconciliation Action Plan, the SATC works across Government and with local higher education providers to promote employment opportunities to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates.
Skilling SA The SATC supports two trainees through Pathway One and Pathway Two of the Skilling SA program in collaboration with the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment.

Agency performance management and development systems

Performance management and development system Performance
Employee Performance Management and Development Reviews (Compliance measured via a custom-made online recording tool) All employees are required to have individual performance management and development plans reviewed as a minimum on a biannual basis.

In 2021-22, 95 per cent of employees had a current performance review in place (the 5 per cent without plans include employees on periods of extended leave).
Employee Performance Management and Development Training

The SATC delivers in-house training to ensure employees have the knowledge required to complete biannual reviews.

All employees, with the exception of 10 new starters that have commenced since 3 June 2022, have attended training relating to the SATC’s current performance management and development review process.

Training Needs Analysis (TNA) A TNA is conducted using information captured within Employee Performance Management and Development Reviews. From this, individual, group learning and development activities are identified.

Work health, safety and return to work programs

Program name Performance
Work Health and Safety Briefings and Induction All employees are required to attend a Work, Health and Safety briefing on joining the agency. Refreshers are delivered on a regular basis to ensure knowledge remains current.

Contractors engaged by the SATC to undertake work on its sites are provided with site specific inductions and where required, provided with safety specific Work, Health and Safety documentation and briefings.
Work Health and Safety Policies and Procedures The SATC has a suite of policies and procedures which address Work, Health and Safety matters and outline safe working practices. Polices are reviewed on an annual basis to ensure they remain current.

Work, Health and Safety Management Plans are created for events and are reviewed yearly. All construction works conducted by the SATC are accompanied by the relevant Work, Health and Safety Management Plans as required by law, and regular inspections are conducted to ensure the requirements of the plans are carried out.
Work Health and Safety Training The SATC has a specific Work, Health and Safety training needs analysis in place in order to identify required Work, Health and Safety training for individual roles. The SATC supports the appointment of three trained Bullying and Harassment Contact Officers.
Work Health and Safety Committee The SATC’s Work, Health and Safety Committee meets four times annually. The Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss Work, Health and Safety matters and acts as the key Work, Health and Safety consultative mechanism.
Employee Assistance Program (EAP) The SATC provides a free and confidential EAP to employees. The SATC’s EAP provider also delivers wellbeing sessions to employees on a biannual basis.
Health, Safety and Wellbeing Initiatives People and Culture and Work, Health and Safety teams work to deliver a calendar of initiatives aimed at promoting physical and mental wellbeing. The SATC’s Culture and Values Working Group provides a forum to drive and influence the agency’s culture through staff engagement and implementation of initiatives which focus on staff health and wellbeing.

 

Workplace injury claims 2021-22 2020-21 % Change
(+ / -)
Total new workplace injury claims 1 1 NA
Fatalities 0 0 NA
Seriously injured workers* 0 0 NA
Significant injuries (where lost time exceeds a working week, expressed as frequency rate per 1000 FTE) 0 0 NA

*number of claimants assessed during the reporting period as having a whole person impairment of 30% or more under the Return to Work Act 2014 (Part 2 Division 5)

Work health and safety regulations 2021-22 2020-21 % Change
(+ / -)
Number of notifiable incidents (Work Health and Safety Act 2012, Part 3) 2 0 +200%
Number of provisional improvement, improvement and prohibition notices (Work Health and Safety Act 2012 Sections 90, 191 and 195) 0 0 NA

 

Return to work costs** 2021-22 2020-21 % Change
(+ / -)
Total gross workers compensation expenditure ($) $13,119 $20,641 - 36%
Income support payments – gross ($) $646 $13,402 - 95%

**before third party recovery

Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/work-health-and-safety-and-return-to-work-performance-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission


Executive employment in the agency

Executive classification Number of executives
Executive A 1
Executive B 3
Executive D 1


Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/executive-employment-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission

The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment has a workforce information page that provides further information on the breakdown of executive gender, salary and tenure by agency.


Financial performance at a glance

The following is a brief summary of the overall financial performance and financial position of the agency. The information is unaudited. For further information refer to the audited 2021-22 financial statements, attached to this report.

Statement of Comprehensive Income
for the year ended 30 June
2021-22
$’000
2020-21
$’000
Income 92 683 93 646
Expenses 103 217 87 594
Net result (10 534) 6 052
Total comprehensive result (10 534) (620)

 

Statement of Financial Position
as at 30 June
2021-22
$’000
2020-21
$’000
Current assets 31 844 34 379
Non-current assets 6 547 8 069
Total assets 38 391 42 448
Current liabilities 17 369 9 403
Non-current liabilities 5 996 7 485
Total liabilities 23 365 16 888
Equity (net assets) 15 026 25 560


Financial report audit opinion: unmodified.

The following graphs show the main items of income and expenses for 2021-22 and 2020-21.



Consultants disclosure

The following is a summary of external consultants that have been engaged by the agency, the nature of work undertaken, and the actual payments made for the work undertaken during the financial year.

No external consultants were engaged by the agency in 2021-22.

Consultancies with a contract value below $10,000 each

Consultancies Purpose $ Actual payment
Nil N/A $ 0

Consultancies with a contract value above $10,000 each

Consultancies Purpose $ Actual payment
Nil N/A $ 0
  Total $ 0


Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/consultants-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission

See also the Consolidated Financial Report of the Department of Treasury and Finance for total value of consultancy contracts across the South Australian Public Sector.


Contractors disclosure

The following is a summary of external contractors that have been engaged by the agency and the nature of work undertaken, where the actual amount paid or payable for work undertaken during the financial year was AUD $10,000 (or equivalent) or greater.

Contractor

Purpose

17 Tours Pty Ltd

Event management services

1834 Hospitality Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

AAPC Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Adelaide Event Operations Pty Ltd

Event operations services

Adelaide Oval SMA Ltd

Event facilities and catering

Adobe Systems Software Ireland Ltd

Digital marketing services

Advanced Tent Technology Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Adventure Charters Investment Trust

Tourism services

Agile Group (Global) Pty Ltd

Security services

Air New Zealand Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Allfab Australia Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure

Alliance Airlines Pty Ltd

Transport services

Altus Traffic Pty Ltd

Traffic management services

Ambleside Distillers Pty Ltd

Event facilities and catering

Apollo Lighting Service Pty Ltd

Event production services

Artcraft Pty Ltd

Tourism and event infrastructure

ATF Services Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Atomix Design Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

Attorney General’s Department

Legal services

Auscycling Ltd

Event operations services

Australian Green Clean (Events) Pty Ltd

Cleaning and waste services

Australian Sports Medicine Federation SA Branch Inc

Event operations services

Australian Tourism Data Warehouse Pty Ltd

ICT services

Australian Trade and Investment Commission

Market research

Australian Venue Co Ltd

Event facilities

Awkar Pty Ltd

Catering services

B&H Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

Belgravia Sports Apparel Pty Ltd

Event uniforms

BHGLS Pty Ltd

Entertainment services

Bianco Hiring Service Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Big Picture Marketing Strategy and Research Ltd

Market research

Big Screen Video Sales Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Big4 Holiday Parks of Australia Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Bikesportz Imports Pty Ltd

Event operations services

Bizar Mobile Pty Ltd

Digital services

Boltz Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Bornbred Talent Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Boyd Public Relations Ltd

Public relations services

Brian Gleeson Event Management Pty Ltd

Event management services

Budget Rent a Car Australia Pty Ltd

Transport services

Calicoan Pty Ltd

Event production services

Carat Australia Media Services Pty Ltd

Advertising services

Carat New Zealand Ltd

Advertising services

Chan Brothers Travel Pte Ltd

Cooperative Marketing

Channel 9 South Australia Pty Ltd

Advertising services

Chicken and Bees Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Christopher David Selwood

Event management services

Churchill Warehouse Pty Ltd

Storage, transport, equipment hire

Coates Hire Operations Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Cook SA Pty Ltd

Event management services

Corporate Aircraft Charter Pty Ltd

Transport services

Corporation of the City of Adelaide

Event infrastructure services

Crawford Containers Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

CSC Corporate Domains Inc

ICT services

CSE Crosscom Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

D77 Pty Ltd

Transport services

Data#3 Ltd

ICT services

Datacom Systems (AU) Pty Ltd

ICT services

David John Clarke

Creative/design services

Declan Christopher Hartley-Brown

Photography services

Dell Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

Deloitte Access Economics Pty Ltd

Market research

Department for Infrastructure and Transport

Traffic management services

Department of the Premier and Cabinet

Media monitoring and ICT services

Discovery Holiday Parks Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing and accommodation services

Dotdigital Apac Pty Ltd

ICT services

Drogo & Co Pty Ltd

Production and broadcast services

Duy Phat Huynh

Photography services

DWP Australia Pty Ltd

Design services

DXC Enterprise Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

Ellismgt Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Emma Humphreys Communications Ltd

Public relations services

Emma Jade McCaskill

Event management services

Encore Event Technologies Pty Ltd

Event production services

Envyus Design Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

Event Timing Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Experience Australia Group Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Expertise Events Pty Ltd

Event management services

First Care Medical Services Australia Pty Ltd

Event medical services

Flight Centre Travel Group Pty Ltd

Travel services and cooperative marketing

Formile Events Pty Ltd

Traffic management services

Frame Creative Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

Frankie Films Pty Ltd

Video production services

G.C Biddle & Others

Legal services

Gayler Family Trust

Event production services

Good Broadcast Ltd

Public relations services

Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd

Records management services

Gravity Media (Australia) Pty Ltd

Broadcast services

Green Edge Cycling Pty Ltd

Sporting services

GT Wine Group Pty Ltd

Advertising services

Harry Allen Vick

Photography services

Health Safety Environment Australia Pty Ltd

Training services

Helloworld Services Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Hoban Recruitment Pty Ltd

Temporary staff (labour)

Holidays of Australia Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

House of Travel Ltd

Cooperative marketing

HTS Group Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Hygge Studio Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Hyundai Motor Company Australia Pty Ltd

Event operations services

I am Helium Pty Ltd

ICT services

Ignite Holidays Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Indoor Pyrotechnics & SA Fireworks Pty Ltd

Event operations services

Institute of Public Administration Australia South Australian Division Inc

Training services

Integrated Event Delivery Management

Event management services

Interflora Australian Unit Ltd

Event operations services

International Management Group of America Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Isentia Pty Ltd

Media monitoring

Jeremy Edward Mackinnon

Video production services

Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

JLGP Pty Ltd

Photography services

Kangaroo Island Sealink Pty Ltd

Transport services

Kantar Public Australia Pty Ltd

Market research

Karen Mary Lindsay

Creative/design services

Karena Armstrong Food Pty Ltd

Event management services

Kelsian Group Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Kimberly Conte

Event management services

Kingsford the Barossa Pty Ltd

Accommodation and catering services

Koben Digital Pty Ltd

ICT services

Kojo Studios Pty Ltd

Video production services

Komodo Media Australia Pty Ltd

Promotional services

KWP Advertising Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

Lachlan Anthony Turner

Event production services

Lieb Management & Beteiligungs GmbH

Marketing representation services

Luxury Escapes Travel Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Maria Elisabetta Pappalardi

Event operations services

Mark Hamilton Hender

Recruitment services

Market Street Hotelier Pty Ltd

Accommodation services

Marshall Power Australia Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Mason Gray Strange Auction (SA) Pty Ltd

Auction services

Matt Peter Gilbertson

Promotional services

Matthew William Keenan

Commentary services

Max Events Pty Ltd

Event management services

Maxima Group Training (aust) Ltd

Temporary staff (trainees)

Mayfair Hotel Management Pty Ltd

Accommodation services

McGregor Tan Research Pty Ltd

Market research

McMahon Services Australia Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Meaghan Katherine Coles

Photography services

Melanie Selwood

Event management services

Metal Fabricators Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Naked Bookings Pty Ltd

Voucher agency service

Natrasha Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

NEC Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

NEC IT Services Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

New Age Marketing e.K.

Cooperative marketing

Newstyle Printing Co Pty Ltd

Printing services

Nexstage Staging & Rigging Technologies Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Nicholas William Bellotti

Video production services

Noortquip Rentals Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Novatech Creative Event Technology Pty Ltd

Event production services

NTT Australia Pty Ltd

ICT services

Nuago Pty Ltd

ICT services

O’Shea’s Organisation Pty Ltd

Cleaning services

Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment

Training services

Olympic Investments (SA) Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

OPS SA

Entertainment services

Peak Metrics Pty Ltd

Market research

Peter Fuller & Associates Pty Ltd

Video production services

Pineapple Media (SA) Pty Ltd

Production and broadcast services

Pivotal Business Technology Pty Ltd

ICT services

Platinum Aircraft Charter Pty Ltd

Transport services

Power On Solutions Pty Ltd

Event communications services

PPI Promotion & Apparel Pty Ltd

Promotional merchandise/uniforms

Precision Models Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Priya Sid Media Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Public Caffe (SA) Pty Ltd

Catering services

Publicis Communications Australia Pty Ltd

Public relations services

PWE Plus GmbH

Advertising services

Qantas Airways Ltd

Cooperative marketing and transport services

Qantas Group Accommodation Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

QBT Pty Ltd

Travel services

R McHenry & K.W Van Der Zwaag

Entertainment services

RAA Insurance Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Railroad Contractors of Australia Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Randstad Pty Ltd

Temporary staff (backfill)

Rawnsley Park Tourism Pty Ltd

Accommodation services

Recruitco Pty Ltd

Temporary staff (events)

Red Balloon Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Redbikini Pty Ltd

Video production

Regional Express Holdings Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Richard Porte

Sporting services

Ricoh Australia Pty Ltd

Printing services

Roadside Services and Solutions Pty Ltd

Tourism infrastructure services

Rohan Dennis

Sporting services

Royal Automobile Association of South Australia Inc

Cooperative marketing

SA Ambulance Service Inc

Event operations services

SA Lift and Loader Pty Ltd

Equipment rental

Satalyst Pty Ltd

ICT services

Select Music Agency Pty Ltd

Entertainment services

Seppeltsfield Road Distillers Pty Ltd

Event catering services

Seppeltsfield Wines Pty Ltd

Event catering services

Serenity Asset Sussex Hotel Management Pty Ltd

Accommodation services

Seven Network (Operations) Ltd

Advertising services

Shanghai Ctrip Commerce Co

Cooperative marketing

Shanghai Linzhi Information Technology Development Co Ltd

Marketing representation services

Shimano Australia Cycling Pty Ltd

Event operations services

Showpony Adelaide Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

Sign Event Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Signs Incorporated Pty Ltd

Tourism and event infrastructure

Simmons & Sons Enterprises Pty Ltd

Freight and distribution services

Singapore Airlines Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Sitehost Pty Ltd

Event facilities, catering and accommodation services

Sixteen-O-Two Advertising N Design

Creative/design services

Skycity Adelaide Pty Ltd

Accommodation services

Sloe Food Company Pty Ltd

Event catering services

Socialbakers A.S.

Digital marketing services

Society Marketing Communications Pty Ltd

Digital marketing services

South Aussie With Cosi Pty Ltd

Production and broadcast services

South Australian Contemporary Music Co Ltd

Event production services

Southern Cross Austereo Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Specialised Event Solutions Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Specialised Solutions Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Spotless Facility Services Pty Ltd

Cleaning services

SRS Security Pty Ltd

Event security services

St John Ambulance Australia South Australia Inc

Event operations services

Stewie's Rigging and Hire Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

STR Global Ltd

Market research

Strava Inc

Digital services

Sunstate Airlines (Qld) Pty Ltd

Transport services

Superloop Broadband Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Talent4 Media Ltd

Promotional services

TBWA Melbourne Pty Ltd

Creative/design services

TBWA New Zealand Ltd

Creative/design services

Telstra Corporation Ltd

Telecommunications services

The Creator’s Hand Pty Ltd

Training services

The Models Mgmt Pty Ltd

Promotional services

The One Picture Group Ltd

Market research

Titan Containers NZ Ltd

Event infrastructure services

Topline Promotions Pty Ltd

Promotional merchandise and uniforms

Tourism Australia

Administrative, marketing, promotional and training services and market research

Traffic Group Australia Pty Ltd

Traffic management services

Trailfinders Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Travelscape LLC

Cooperative marketing

Trustee for AB Edible Trust & DF Edible Trust & JD Edible Trust

Promotional services

Trustee for BDA Unit Trust

Market research

Trustee for Eckersley Development Trust

Accommodation services

Trustee for Forman Family Trust

Photography services

Trustee for Fowlers Bay Eco Park Trust

Tourism services

Trustee for Goin Off Safaris Trust

Tourism services

Trustee for McEwan Family Trust

Commentary services

Trustee for Mt Lofty Operations Unit Trust

Accommodation and catering services

Trustee for Murphy Holdings Unit Trust

Transport services

Trustee for Parsons Plumbing and Gas

Event infrastructure services

Trustee for Phil Hoffman Travel

Cooperative marketing

Trustee for Pink Fence Hire Trust

Event infrastructure services

Trustee for the A & AM Palumbo Family Trust No. 2

Accommodation services

Trustee for the Adelaide Event Group Unit Trust

Event infrastructure services

Trustee for the Dirty Food Family Trust

Event management services

Trustee for the JAG Trading Trust

Event operations services

Trustee for the Majestic Roof Garden Hotel Class Trust

Accommodation services

Trustee for the Nick Stock Family Trust

Event management services

Trustee for TIR Family Trust

Temporary staff (labour)

Trustee for WDM Advertising Unit Trust

Creative/design services

Trustee for Wendt Farms Trust

Accommodation services

University of Adelaide

Software development

Valsport Pty Ltd

Promotional services

Village Gate Pty Ltd

Signage and printing services

Virgin Australia Airlines Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing and transport services

Virtuoso Australia Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Visualcom Pty Ltd

Event operations services

Voice Project Pty Ltd

Research services

Vok Beverages Pty Ltd

Event catering

Wagstaff Worldwide Inc

Marketing representation services

Wavemaker Australia Pty Ltd

Advertising services

Webjet Marketing Pty Ltd

Cooperative marketing

Wejugo Pty Ltd

Digital services

Wilson Parking Australia Pty Ltd

Parking services

Winc Australia Pty Limited

Storage and distribution services

Yaao Marketing Consulting Co Ltd

Marketing representation services

YouGov Singapore Pte Ltd

Digital services

Ziptrak Pty Ltd

Event infrastructure services


Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/contractors-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission

The details of South Australian Government-awarded contracts for goods, services, and works are displayed on the SA Tenders and Contracts website. View the agency list of contracts.

The website also provides details of across government contracts.


Other information

None to report.


Risk management

Risk and audit at a glance

The Audit and Risk Committee assists the SATC Board in fulfilling its responsibilities relating to the annual financial statements as well as reviewing the adequacy of the SATC’s accounting and reporting systems, internal controls, risk management practices, and administrative policies and procedures. The Committee’s roles and responsibilities and scope are defined in its Terms of Reference.

The SATC is committed to ensuring that a risk management approach is applied to all business activities to ensure that the Agency maximises opportunities while not exposing the organisation to unacceptable levels of risk. The SATC aims to ensure that risk management is embedded in its decision-making, processes, and culture, and contributes to the achievement of its strategic objectives.

The SATC’s risk management practices are based on the International Risk Management Standard (ISO 31000:2018). In 2021-22 the SATC’s risk management framework was updated to reflect the changes to the South Australian Government’s procurement processes which came into effect on 1 July 2021. The Framework provides minimum requirements and practical guidance to all staff on how to implement risk management processes across a wide range of activities undertaken by the SATC.

The SATC continued to manage its risks throughout the year by undertaking regular reviews of the risk register, developing detailed risk management plans for SATC managed events, and completing risk assessments for new projects and procurements.

During 2021, the Audit and Risk Committee took on the responsibilities of the Agency Security Committee under the Government’s Protective Security Framework and the Committee will consider security as part of its regular meetings.

The annual Business Continuity Plan test was undertaken in February 2022 and key learnings from this exercise were actioned and business continuity processes and documentation updated accordingly.


Fraud detected in the agency

Category/nature of fraud Number of instances
Nil Nil

NB: Fraud reported includes actual and reasonably suspected incidents of fraud.

Strategies implemented to control and prevent fraud

The SATC is committed to maintaining a work environment free of fraud and corrupt behaviour. The SATC has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and policies, in line with its fraud risk assessment and Fraud and Corruption Policy. The SATC offers protection to genuine whistleblowers to enable disclosure of illegal activities or corruption to be made. These arrangements meet the specific needs of the SATC, and all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud, as well as to investigate and recover the proceeds of fraud, have been taken.

Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/fraud-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission 


Public interest disclosure

Number of occasions on which public interest information has been disclosed to a responsible officer of the agency under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2018:

Nil

Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/whistle-blowers-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission

Note: Disclosure of public interest information was previously reported under the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1993 and repealed by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2018 on 1/7/2019.


Reporting required under any other act or regulation

Act or Regulation Requirement
South Australian Tourism Commission Act 1993 (1) The Commission must, on or before 30 September in every year, forward to the Minister a report on the Commission's operations for the preceding financial year.
(2) The report must contain—
(a) the audited statements of account of the Commission for the preceding financial year; and
(b) a report on—
(i) the state of tourism and the tourism industry in the State; and
(ii) the Commission's plans and the extent to which they have been implemented; and
(iii) the extent to which the Commission met the targets set in the performance agreement for the preceding financial year; and
(c) any other information required by or under the provisions of this Act or any other Act.


(i) report on the state of tourism and the tourism industry in the state

After the impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic caused the most severe contraction of tourism on record, there have been strong signs of recovery for South Australia’s visitor economy in 2021-22.

The latest results for the June 2022 year end have seen South Australia’s visitor economy grow to $6.2 billion, ahead of the SATC’s original impact forecast of $6.1 billion. This is a real achievement – having made serious inroads on reclaiming the state’s 2019 $8.1 billion record high, after dropping to just $4.4 billion at its lowest point during the pandemic (year end March 2021). 

Driving these results has been continued strength in the intrastate market as South Australians holidayed closer to home, as well as the end of lockdowns and border restrictions which saw consumer confidence surge and recovery in the interstate market.

With South Australia’s borders opening to interstate in late November 2021, pent-up demand and a greater sense of certainty saw this market surge. Latest data shows the interstate market grew to reach a post-COVID high of $1.9 billion in the year to June 2022 (worth $2.7 billion pre pandemic), and by June 2022, domestic aviation capacity was almost at pre-COVID levels.

With the nation’s borders opening in February 2022, international market expenditure has seen strong growth in that short space of time, reaching $272 million for the year to June 2022. While recovery is likely to be slower than interstate, indications – such as international aviation rebuilding and the cruise resumption in 2022-23 – show recovery to its pre-COVID $1.2 billion is on track.

Looking at tourism employment, the latest data for 2020-21 shows the sector employed 37,300 people, down from 40,400 in 2019-20. While it has decreased, these results are better than expected due to the positive impacts of the former Federal Government’s JobKeeper initiative which was active until 28 March 2021. The full effect of COVID-19 on tourism employment will not be clear until the 2021-22 State Tourism Satellite Accounts statistics are released in June 2023.

The SATC’s focus is squarely on reclaiming South Australia’s once record $8.1 billion visitor economy, on the way to $12.8 billion by 2030. A range of initiatives have been delivered which aim to promote the state as a tourism destination and support the tens of thousands of businesses across South Australia’s tourism industry.

Marketing

With South Australians holidaying at home like never before, marketing activity capitalised on this trend, with targeted campaigns and incentives that drove demand and bookings.

The SATC’s domestic advertising campaign ‘For Those Who Want A Little More’, had several phases of activity throughout the year. The campaign positions South Australia as an accessible holiday destination for locals and visitors alike and consists of television, outdoor and digital advertising.  Messaging also highlighted road trips to capitalise on this trend and encouraged locals to take an extended trip into the state’s tourism regions. The campaign was well received by both the intrastate and interstate markets with awareness/appeal, consideration and intention measures tracking above average when compared to similar SATC campaigns. A dedicated campaign ‘Have a Date with your State’, launched in February 2022, targeted young locals in the 18–34year-old age group to further entice this audience to take a trip within their state with friends and family. Exceeding objectives, the campaign reached 602,000 (79 per cent) of the target audience with a total of seven million advertising impressions served which attributed to over 32,000 leads to South Australia tourism operators.

The SATC’s consumer website, southaustralia.com, recorded 6.85 million website visits by South Australians, generating 1.25 million leads to tourism operators and travel partners.

‘For Those Who Want A Little More’ also ran in key interstate markets during 2021-22. During this time, southaustralia.com saw 3.39 million website visits from interstate, generating 512,000 leads to tourism operators and travel partners. Interstate expenditure also grew to $1.9 billion as of June 2022, a post-COVID high, but 28 per cent below its $2.7 billion pre-COVID performance.

A key stimulus initiative, the Great State Voucher program, wrapped up in 2021-22. The final four rounds ran from September 2021 to May 2022, injecting $87.8 million into the state’s visitor economy. Over the life of the scheme, the vouchers generated a total $148.7 million into the state’s visitor economy. Originally launched in October 2020 the vouchers provided incentives for consumers to book accommodation and experiences. It proved popular with both consumers and operators, achieving 269,000 bookings across South Australia and supporting 808 jobs in total.

International borders opened on 21 February 2022, paving the way for international travellers to return. In line with this, the SATC undertook marketing and PR activity in key global markets including the United Kingdom, Europe, North America, Singapore and New Zealand. International expenditure reached $272 million for the year ending June 2022. In this short time, international expenditure in South Australia has seen strong growth, showing pent up demand for the state.

To encourage international visitation from the working holiday maker market, the SATC launched a £10 flight campaign in April 2022. Over 16,000 people in the UK and Ireland registered their interest in buying one of the 200 £10/€10 return tickets to Adelaide – with the flights selling out in under five minutes. The campaign was so popular that it was extended, offering a further round of return flights at £499 to working holiday makers who were unsuccessful in the first round.

Underpinning all campaigns is PR activity across the international and domestic markets. It achieved a total potential audience reach of over 60.1 billion as well as a total of 3,366 articles promoting South Australia and keeping it top of mind as a must-see travel destination. This was achieved through always-on press office pitching, media familiarisations, broadcast sponsorships, events, influencer programs, and brand partnerships.

Events South Australia

Events are an important driver of visitation, giving people a reason to visit the state ‘right now’. The SATC delivered four managed events in COVID-safe formats last financial year and supported a range of regional events and sponsored events which have helped drive visitation and expenditure in the CBD and regional South Australia.

Managed events

  • 2021 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, October: Virtual activities including a telemetry challenge and virtual forum were hosted in order to stay connected and engaged with the event audience.
  • 2021 National Pharmacies Christmas Pageant, 13 November: This much-loved event took place for the second year at Adelaide Oval due to COVID-19 restrictions. An audience with a capacity of 35,000 was permitted. The event was broadcast by Channel 9, achieving a peak audience of 159,678 viewers and ranking the number one program in Adelaide on the night.
  • 2022 Santos Festival of Cycling, 21-29 January: For the second consecutive year, the festival was held in place of the Santos Tour Down Under due to the impacts of COVID-19 and international border restrictions. The Santos Festival of Cycling welcomed domestic teams and riders across a range of cycling disciplines to race in South Australia. This event was strategically important, helping keep the state’s connection with the sport of cycling, with sponsors, fans, and the community.
  • 2022 Tasting Australia presented by RAA Travel, 29 April-8 May: Due to border restrictions in the programming and planning phase, the event focused on Australian talent for the second year in a row. The program was well supported by industry with over 200 events held across 11 South Australian tourism regions. More than 60,000 people visited the festival hub, Town Square - up from 54,000 in 2021.

Sponsored events

The SATC continued to grow and expand the state’s event calendar, focusing on attracting new events and growing event ‘clusters’ during the traditionally quieter winter months.

A range of events were secured in 2021-22, including:

  • Harvest Rock (2022-2024) a new two-day contemporary international music festival will be held annually in the city parklands from November 2022 to 2024. The destination music festival will be a unique proposition on the Australian music calendar featuring iconic international artists, leading Australian artists, the state’s best food and wine, culinary stages, pop-up cellar doors, art installations and VIP corporate experiences.
  • Wallabies v South Africa (Springboks) and Wallaroos v New Zealand (Black Ferns) – Adelaide hosted a historic rugby double-header blockbuster at Adelaide Oval on 27 August 2022. These international test matches drew a crowd of over 36,000. The Wallabies last played in Adelaide in 2004 and this was the first time the Wallaroos played here.
  • SkySong, the centrepiece of the 2022 Adelaide Fringe, featured hundreds of drones flying in majestic formation to a soundtrack of First Nations storytelling through poetry and song. More than 39,000 people attended the show held from 11 to 20 March 2022 at Leconfield and Richard Hamilton Wines in McLaren Vale.
  • The Australian Age Swimming Championships were held from 11 to 18 April 2022 at the South Australian Aquatic and Leisure Centre. The Australian National Swimming Championships were also held from 17 to 22 May 2022 which saw Australia’s Olympic and Paralympic elite vie for national team selection ahead of the 2022 World Swimming Championships and 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.
  • Counterpointe - the Australian Ballet brought a powerful and energetic performance exclusively to Adelaide at Her Majesty’s Theatre from 8 to 13 July 2022, with fantastic reviews and audiences.
  • The 2022 AFL Masters National Carnival will be held from 25 September to 1 October 2022. The AFL Masters National Carnival is the largest mass participation football event in Australia, expected to attract in excess of 2,000 participants and generate an estimated $3 million in economic benefit.

The winter events calendar was expanded, with Australia’s newest major event, Illuminate Adelaide, making its debut in July-August 2021. Despite the impact of COVID-19 including a state-wide lockdown and restrictions on interstate borders, the event attracted an attendance of more than 500,000, generating over $30 million into the state’s visitor economy. Illuminate Adelaide 2021 also included a regional program with activations ‘Digital Garden’ in Mount Gambier from 9 June to 4 July 2021 which attracted more than 10,000 visitors over the four weeks and ‘Big Picture Series x Colour Tumby’ from 13 to 21 August 2021 in Tumby Bay. An installation planned for Renmark had to be postponed to June 2022 due to interstate travel restrictions preventing the artist from travelling to SA.

The Regional Event Fund sponsored 54 events in 2021-22, more than doubling the number of events supported in the previous financial year. This was in part due to an additional $1 million in regional event funding from the State Government. Events supported in 2021-22 included Fringe Mount Gambier (Limestone Coast), Clare Valley Gourmet Week, Oakbank Easter Carnival (Adelaide Hills), SALA Festival (state wide), and True Grit SA (Riverland). 

In 2021-22, the team continued to support the event industry in the COVID-normal environment, including working closely with SA Health and communicating updates or providing direct advice to event operators.

Destination Development

With tourism recovery on the right path, international cruise lines are set to return and international aviation has not only resumed but it is rebuilding in line with demand.

Cruise

The Federal Government lifted the ban on international cruise ships on 17 April 2022, allowing cruise ships to operate in Australia. During the 2022-23 season, 106 cruise ship visits are scheduled to arrive at South Australian ports and anchorages. This exceeds the 82 visits made in what was a blockbuster season in 2018-19, when the sector contributed $145 million to the state’s visitor economy.

Throughout the pandemic, the SATC has maintained contact with cruise lines to keep South Australia top of mind for the return of cruise visitors. The SATC has worked with Flinders Ports, Kangaroo Island Council and Port Lincoln Council to ensure that the infrastructure required to service these ships is in place and ready.

Aviation

The SATC continued to work with Adelaide Airport and the State Government to support the return of international flights. Pre-COVID, there were nine international airlines providing up to 52 flights per week to Adelaide. As international travel demand continues to grow, the number of airlines operating to Adelaide is also increasing.

As of 30 June 2022, international carriers flying direct into Adelaide were Qatar Airways, Singapore Airlines, Malaysia Airlines, Air New Zealand, Jetstar International and Fiji Airways, providing 27 flights per week. The SATC is continuing to investigate opportunities for new airline routes (national and international) with Adelaide Airport.

Domestic aviation is also rebuilding in line with increased consumer confidence and a sense of certainty in restrictions. As of 30 June 2022, domestic seats were almost at pre-COVID levels, with approximately 68,000 seats per week supplied across four domestic carriers (Qantas Airlines, Virgin Australia, Jetstar and Rex Airlines).  

Tourism Industry Development Fund

A key support measure to aid the recovery of South Australia’s tourism industry was the $20 million Tourism Industry Development Fund (TIDF). Fully allocated in 2021-22, the Fund encouraged private investment in regional tourism infrastructure, helping drive tourism demand and create jobs. During this period, 61 projects were funded. In total, grants were awarded to 114 projects across the state, worth a combined total of nearly $82.7 million. It is expected the 114 projects will create 608 ongoing jobs, over 1,180 temporary construction jobs and generate an estimated $74.5 million in visitor expenditure each year. As of 30 June 2022, 59 of the 114 projects are complete or nearly complete, providing visitors and locals alike with new and improved accommodation and experiences to enjoy.

Accommodation development

There continues to be strong private investment in accommodation in South Australia. In 2021-22, one hotel opened in the Adelaide CBD, the 251-room Sofitel Adelaide on Currie Street. Another four hotels are currently under construction, the Marriott Hotel, Vibe Hotel, TRYP Hotel and the Ramada Playford Hotel which will contribute 737 rooms when open. Overall, there were 453 new rooms and 416 refurbished rooms made available across our tourism regions. The TIDF was a key driver for private investment in accommodation in the regions, contributing 281 new rooms and 400 refurbished rooms.

(ii) the Commission's plans and the extent to which they have been implemented.

This information is outlined throughout the 2021-22 Annual Report.

(iii) the extent to which the Commission met the targets set in the performance agreement for the preceding financial year.

The SATC’s Board Performance Agreement and Board Performance Agreement Report can be found at Appendix B and Appendix C at the end of the 2021-22 Annual Report.


Reporting required under the Carers’ Recognition Act 2005

Not applicable to the agency.


Public complaints

Number of public complaints reported

Complaint categories Sub-categories Example Number of complaints 2021-22
Professional behaviour Staff attitude Failure to demonstrate values such as empathy, respect, fairness, courtesy, extra mile; cultural competency 0
Professional behaviour Staff competency Failure to action service request; poorly informed decisions; incorrect or incomplete service provided 0
Professional behaviour Staff knowledge Lack of service specific knowledge; incomplete or out-of-date knowledge 0
Communication Communication quality Inadequate, delayed or absent communication with customer 1
Communication Confidentiality Customer’s confidentiality or privacy not respected; information shared incorrectly 0
Service delivery Systems/technology System offline; inaccessible to customer; incorrect result/information provided; poor system design 0
Service delivery Access to services Service difficult to find; location poor; facilities/ environment poor standard; not accessible to customers with disabilities 0
Service delivery Process Processing error; incorrect process used; delay in processing application; process not customer responsive 0
Policy Policy application Incorrect policy interpretation; incorrect policy applied; conflicting policy advice given 0
Policy Policy content Policy content difficult to understand; policy unreasonable or disadvantages customer 0
Service quality Information Incorrect, incomplete, out dated or inadequate information; not fit for purpose 0
Service quality Access to information Information difficult to understand, hard to find or difficult to use; not plain English 1
Service quality Timeliness Lack of staff punctuality; excessive waiting times (outside of service standard); timelines not met 0
Service quality Safety Maintenance; personal or family safety; duty of care not shown; poor security service/ premises; poor cleanliness 1
Service quality Service responsiveness Service design doesn’t meet customer needs; poor service fit with customer expectations 0
No case to answer No case to answer Third party; customer misunderstanding; redirected to another agency; insufficient information to investigate 37
    Total 40

 

Additional metrics Total
Number of positive feedback comments 0
Number of negative feedback comments 4
Total number of feedback comments 4
% complaints resolved within policy timeframes 100%


Data for previous years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/public-complaints-reporting-south-australian-tourism-commission 

Service improvements

In line with PC039- Complaint Management in the South Australian Public Sector, in 2021-22, the SATC implemented a new Complaints and Feedback Policy and process, including the implementation of a new Complaint Management System which will allow for collecting, reporting and monitoring complaints and feedback to inform service improvement. The new Policy is designed to identify opportunities to improve customer experience and satisfaction within the delivery of services.

The new Policy conforms to the principles of the Australian/New Zealand Standard: Guidelines for Complaint Management in Organisations (AS/NZS10002:2014) (the Standard) and the Commonwealth Ombudsman Complaint Management Framework and Department of the Premier and Cabinet Circular PC039 Complaint Management in the South Australian Public Sector.

The complaints and feedback data will be reviewed and analysed regularly to identify systemic issues and trends and to determine resolution of outcomes and improvements to remedy issues.

Compliance statement

The SATC is compliant with Premier and Cabinet Circular 039 – complaint management in the South Australian public sector Y
The SATC has communicated the content of PC 039 and the agency’s related complaints policies and procedures to employees. Y